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people:top [2019/03/27 11:10]
jcolabella [Luke Hunsberger]
people:top [2019/08/19 15:13]
jebailie
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 ===== Faculty ===== ===== Faculty =====
  
-==== Simon Ellis ==== 
- 
-Visiting Assistant Professor of Computer Science \\ \\ 
-[[http://​www.cs.vassar.edu/​~sellis|Simon Ellis]] received his PhD in 2016 from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, specialising in the application of cognitive computing to artificially intelligent agents for complex board, card and role-playing games. This remains the primary focus of his research, although he is also interested in "​non-educational"​ computer games which permit learning as a '​side-effect'​ of playing the game: in particular, using such a game to help high school students to learn and understand basic computer science concepts without actively learning them. Some of his other interests include programming languages, software development,​ philosophy, and design, of A.I., and just about //​anything//​ to do with games. 
  
  
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 ==== Marc Smith ==== ==== Marc Smith ====
  
-Associate Professor, CS Dept. Chair \\ \\+Associate Professor \\ \\
 [[https://​www.cs.vassar.edu/​people/​mlsmith/​top|Professor Smith]] earned his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Central Florida. He worked for AT&T for fifteen years, in several different IT capacities, during which time his Ph.D. studies were sponsored by AT&​T'​s Doctoral Support Program. His research spans elements of theoretical and experimental computer science, in the area of parallel and distributed computation. His interests include models of concurrency,​ bioinformatics (specifically,​ computational phylogeny), and programming languages (semantics, paradigms, and unifying theories). [[https://​www.cs.vassar.edu/​people/​mlsmith/​top|Professor Smith]] earned his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Central Florida. He worked for AT&T for fifteen years, in several different IT capacities, during which time his Ph.D. studies were sponsored by AT&​T'​s Doctoral Support Program. His research spans elements of theoretical and experimental computer science, in the area of parallel and distributed computation. His interests include models of concurrency,​ bioinformatics (specifically,​ computational phylogeny), and programming languages (semantics, paradigms, and unifying theories).
  
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 [[http://​www.cs.vassar.edu/​~pnaumov|Professor Naumov]] has Diploma in Mathematics from Moscow State University and Ph.D. in Computer Science from Cornell University, both with specialization in Logic. His present [[http://​www.cs.vassar.edu/​~pnaumov/​publications.html|research]] is focused on logical systems for reasoning about multi-agent systems, information flow, formal epistemology,​ social networks, and game theory. Pavel coauthored over twenty peer-reviewed publications with [[http://​www.cs.vassar.edu/​~pnaumov/​students.html|undergraduate students]]. Previously, he has published papers on proof complexity, type theory, automated deduction, and modal logics. Pavel is teaching Computer Science I: Problem-Solving and Abstraction,​ Foundations of Computer Science, Language Theory and Computation,​ and Special Topics course on Foundations of Multiagent Systems. [[http://​www.cs.vassar.edu/​~pnaumov|Professor Naumov]] has Diploma in Mathematics from Moscow State University and Ph.D. in Computer Science from Cornell University, both with specialization in Logic. His present [[http://​www.cs.vassar.edu/​~pnaumov/​publications.html|research]] is focused on logical systems for reasoning about multi-agent systems, information flow, formal epistemology,​ social networks, and game theory. Pavel coauthored over twenty peer-reviewed publications with [[http://​www.cs.vassar.edu/​~pnaumov/​students.html|undergraduate students]]. Previously, he has published papers on proof complexity, type theory, automated deduction, and modal logics. Pavel is teaching Computer Science I: Problem-Solving and Abstraction,​ Foundations of Computer Science, Language Theory and Computation,​ and Special Topics course on Foundations of Multiagent Systems.
  
 +==== Simon Ellis ====
 +
 +Visiting Assistant Professor of Computer Science \\ \\
 +[[http://​www.cs.vassar.edu/​~sellis|Simon Ellis]] received his PhD in 2016 from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, specialising in the application of cognitive computing to artificially intelligent agents for complex board, card and role-playing games. This remains the primary focus of his research, although he is also interested in "​non-educational"​ computer games which permit learning as a '​side-effect'​ of playing the game: in particular, using such a game to help high school students to learn and understand basic computer science concepts without actively learning them. Some of his other interests include programming languages, software development,​ philosophy, and design, of A.I., and just about //​anything//​ to do with games.
  
 ===== Former Staff ===== ===== Former Staff =====